paul cross
Posted February 18, 2015 by paul cross
I just finished writing a reply on Dean's blog about New Year's just to have it go to who-knows-where and who-knows-why. Didn't print. My mind tends to dismiss things like this as plain old technical snafu but only after I consider the universal event of being denied to speak. It was in reference to the ongoing actions relating to ISIS. I would like to initiate a discussion of the current events related to this world changing action. Why because it initiates concern, fear and anger within me. I think the IE community is a perfect forum for this discussion because the members represent a variety of world views from numerous angles of culture. This issue/problem is not going to go away without resounding consequences for parts of the world. More for some than others.
The situation invokes this thought from me. To force your beliefs upon people has absolutely no sincere value at all. It undermines the very definition of belief. Only through free will can true belief be founded. IS represents the largest group of codependent mentally sick people that have ever existed to my knowledge. Codependency is a mental illness in which the ill person is emotionally effected when another person they wish to coexist with does not act according to the way the ill person feels or thinks to the point of irrational behavior. It never goes away without specialized treatment. There are numerous cases in modern marriage where the only way the victimized person in the relationship escaped the terror was to defend themselves by killing the ill offender or was killed themselves. I realize there are codependents existing in perhaps every religious group that exists and that codependency is often praised as strong faith. I think because we prize the freedom to believe as we do codependency is not recognize nor distinguished from reasonable behavior relative to belief.
Comments
Stan Ellis wrote at April 22, 2015
0 Votes
Geoff, I applaud your observation between Psychopath and Sociopathic behavior. Most of what you describe is on point. Attached is an article by a professor who uses the DSM5 to underpin a clarification between the two disorders. It appears that if Radicalized Christian/Muslims are truly Psychopaths then they are physiologically predisposed (genetically innate)as opposed to having "Learned" their antisocial traits do Sociopaths. I tend to believe these radicals are more sociopathic than psychopathic since their maladaptive behaviors are primarily influenced by a radical interpretation of religious doctrine than a genetic anomaly.

Sociopath versus Psychopath
Dr. Scott Bonn, PhD: “Psychology Today” (Magazine).

The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), released by the American Psychiatric Association in 2013, lists both sociopathy and psychopathy under the heading of Antisocial Personality Disorders (ASPD). These disorders share many common behavioral traits which lead to the confusion between them. Key traits that sociopaths and psychopaths share include:
• A disregard for laws and social mores
• A disregard for the rights of others
• A failure to feel remorse or guilt
• A tendency to display violent behavior
In addition to their commonalities, sociopaths and psychopaths also have their own unique behavioral characteristics, as well.
Sociopaths tend to be nervous and easily agitated. They are volatile and prone to emotional outbursts, including fits of rage. They are likely to be uneducated and live on the fringes of society, unable to hold down a steady job or stay in one place for very long. It is difficult but not impossible for sociopaths to form attachments with others. Many sociopaths are able to form an attachment to a particular individual or group, although they have no regard for society in general or its rules. In the eyes of others, sociopaths will appear to be very disturbed. Any crimes committed by a sociopath, including murder, will tend to be haphazard, disorganized and spontaneous rather than planned.
Psychopaths, on the other hand, are unable to form emotional attachments or feel real empathy with others, although they often have disarming or even charming personalities. Psychopaths are very manipulative and can easily gain people’s trust. They learn to mimic emotions, despite their inability to actually feel them, and will appear normal to unsuspecting people. Psychopaths are often well educated and hold steady jobs. Some are so good at manipulation and mimicry that they have families and other long-term relationships without those around them ever suspecting their true nature.
When committing crimes, psychopaths carefully plan out every detail in advance and often have contingency plans in place. Unlike their sociopathic counterparts, psychopathic criminals are cool, calm, and meticulous. Their crimes, whether violent or non-violent, will be highly organized and generally offer few clues for authorities to pursue. Intelligent psychopaths make excellent white-collar criminals and "con artists" due to their calm and charismatic natures.
The cause of psychopathy is different than the cause of sociopathy (1). It is believed that psychopathy is the result of “nature” (genetics) while sociopathy is the result of “nurture” (environment). Psychopathy is related to a physiological defect that results in the underdevelopment of the part of the brain responsible for impulse control and emotions. Sociopathy, on the other hand, is more likely the product of childhood trauma and physical/emotional abuse. Because sociopathy appears to be learned rather than innate, sociopaths are capable of empathy in certain limited circumstances but not in others, and with a few individuals but not others.
Psychopathy is the most dangerous of all antisocial personality disorders because of the way psychopaths dissociate emotionally from their actions, regardless of how terrible those actions may be. Many prolific and notorious serial killers, including the late Ted Bundy and John Wayne Gacy, and Dennis Rader ("Bind, Torture, Kill" or BTK) are unremorseful psychopaths. Psychopathic killers view their innocent victims as inhuman objects to be tormented and violated for their amusement.
Dr. Scott Bonn, PhD, is professor of sociology and criminology
Stan Ellis
Geoff wrote at April 18, 2015
0 Votes
Interesting perspectives written here about this topic you have introduced Paul.

I ask the question (Understanding the answer of course) who are the real psychopaths, Radicalised Christians or Radicalised Muslims?
Note my choice of Psychopaths rather than Sociopaths.
Sociopaths tend to be nervous and easily agitated. They are volatile and prone to emotional outbursts, including fits of rage. They are likely to be uneducated and live on the fringes of society, unable to hold down a steady job or stay in one place for very long. It is difficult but not impossible for sociopaths to form attachments with others. Many sociopaths are able to form an attachment to a particular individual or group, although they have no regard for society in general or its rules. In the eyes of others, sociopaths will appear to be very disturbed. Any crimes committed by a sociopath, including murder, will tend to be haphazard, disorganized and spontaneous rather than planned.
Psychopaths, on the other hand, are unable to form emotional attachments or feel real empathy with others, although they often have disarming or even charming personalities. Psychopaths are very manipulative and can easily gain people’s trust. They learn to mimic emotions, despite their inability to actually feel them, and will appear normal to unsuspecting people. Psychopaths are often well educated and hold steady jobs. Some are so good at manipulation and mimicry that they have families and other long-term relationships without those around them ever suspecting their true nature.
As an example of modern day radical thinking (From a Christian perspective) take a look at this short youtube video and you will see what I mean.
http://www.youtube.com/embed/6-3X5hIFXYU
We have not come far from the Crusades as a species and we never will until we ditch this insane notion of Religion as somehow being relevant to life on this planet.

Love & peace,
Geoff Ogilvie
Geoff
Stan Ellis wrote at April 22, 2015
0 Votes
Geoff, I applaud your comparison between psychopaths and sociopaths. Most of what you describe is on point. Attached is an article by a prominent professor using the DSM-5 to clarify the distinction between the two disorders.
Given that psychopathy is determined by physiology (innate genetics) and sociopathy's determinant is the result of learned behavior, I believe Radicalized Christians/Muslims are probably Sociopaths since their learned maladaptive behaviors have resulted from a radical or fundamentalist interpretation of religious doctrine probably coupled with influential childhood dramas/traumas. The reality of the Radical Religious Practices is probably a combination of both disorders. True Psychopaths in command of terrorist Sociopaths.


Sociopath versus Psychopath
Dr. Scott Bonn, PhD: “Psychology Today” (Magazine).

The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), released by the American Psychiatric Association in 2013, lists both sociopathy and psychopathy under the heading of Antisocial Personality Disorders (ASPD). These disorders share many common behavioral traits which lead to the confusion between them. Key traits that sociopaths and psychopaths share include:
• A disregard for laws and social mores
• A disregard for the rights of others
• A failure to feel remorse or guilt
• A tendency to display violent behavior
In addition to their commonalities, sociopaths and psychopaths also have their own unique behavioral characteristics, as well.
Sociopaths tend to be nervous and easily agitated. They are volatile and prone to emotional outbursts, including fits of rage. They are likely to be uneducated and live on the fringes of society, unable to hold down a steady job or stay in one place for very long. It is difficult but not impossible for sociopaths to form attachments with others. Many sociopaths are able to form an attachment to a particular individual or group, although they have no regard for society in general or its rules. In the eyes of others, sociopaths will appear to be very disturbed. Any crimes committed by a sociopath, including murder, will tend to be haphazard, disorganized and spontaneous rather than planned.
Psychopaths, on the other hand, are unable to form emotional attachments or feel real empathy with others, although they often have disarming or even charming personalities. Psychopaths are very manipulative and can easily gain people’s trust. They learn to mimic emotions, despite their inability to actually feel them, and will appear normal to unsuspecting people. Psychopaths are often well educated and hold steady jobs. Some are so good at manipulation and mimicry that they have families and other long-term relationships without those around them ever suspecting their true nature.
When committing crimes, psychopaths carefully plan out every detail in advance and often have contingency plans in place. Unlike their sociopathic counterparts, psychopathic criminals are cool, calm, and meticulous. Their crimes, whether violent or non-violent, will be highly organized and generally offer few clues for authorities to pursue. Intelligent psychopaths make excellent white-collar criminals and "con artists" due to their calm and charismatic natures.
The cause of psychopathy is different than the cause of sociopathy (1). It is believed that psychopathy is the result of “nature” (genetics) while sociopathy is the result of “nurture” (environment). Psychopathy is related to a physiological defect that results in the underdevelopment of the part of the brain responsible for impulse control and emotions. Sociopathy, on the other hand, is more likely the product of childhood trauma and physical/emotional abuse. Because sociopathy appears to be learned rather than innate, sociopaths are capable of empathy in certain limited circumstances but not in others, and with a few individuals but not others.
Psychopathy is the most dangerous of all antisocial personality disorders because of the way psychopaths dissociate emotionally from their actions, regardless of how terrible those actions may be. Many prolific and notorious serial killers, including the late Ted Bundy and John Wayne Gacy, and Dennis Rader ("Bind, Torture, Kill" or BTK) are unremorseful psychopaths. Psychopathic killers view their innocent victims as inhuman objects to be tormented and violated for their amusement.
Dr. Scott Bonn, PhD, is professor of sociology and criminology
Last Update on April 22, 2015 by Stan Ellis
Stan Ellis
paul cross wrote at February 26, 2015
0 Votes
Thanks for responding James and Stan. Yes indeed Stan the sociopaths are drawn into the mix like moths to a light. And James a great point that gets obscured by the conflict - there is a process of re-balancing of the energy taking place and effecting the planet positively and this is and will have a more lasting consequence than ISIS upon the greater population of non-ISIS inhabitants on the planet. The essence of life is eternal and yet the manifestations of life are not. Manifestation is all inclusive and does not differentiate as to good and evil. It just is. One does not accept the other. And so we are left with a conflict that must be resolved. The intentions of ISIS do not achieve a balance, nor a direction of achievement but rather a step backwards to horrors that humanity has already faced. This will not be a choice of many but of few and the many will overcome the few and yet another lesson will be learned.
Last Update on February 26, 2015 by paul cross
paul cross
Stan Ellis wrote at February 19, 2015
0 Votes
Paul thank you for your well-thought out analysis. I certainly agree that codependency is a legitimate explanation of the ISSIS agenda. Sociopathic Behavior is another legitimate mental illness that can explain what ISSIS is all about in imposing their radical religious fundamentalism on others. Sociopaths can seem normal ad even brilliant on the surface, but their abnormality is obvious in their total lack of compassion, empathy, and regard for the feelings of others. Their self-righteous and self-serving agenda is all that matters to them. Labeling their behavior is moot at this point. As you pointed out "specialized treatment" (for codependency, et.al.) is really the issue we need to address in bringing an end to the madness of ISSIS. As Deepak Chopra put it, if benevolence was not an Immanent Quality of being human, then humankind would have destroyed itself eons ago. Benevolence in the form of love, compassion, empathy, generosity, forgiveness, etc. are powerful forms of Positive Mental Energy expressed as INTENTION and a critical mass of INTENDERS radically changes whatever it is focused on... as Lyn McTaggart and others have demonstrated. Therein is one option for addressing the Negative Energy of ISSIS.
Stan Ellis
James Milton wrote at February 18, 2015
0 Votes
You're totally right of course Paul. What we are seeing though, is an outer effect. There is a re-balance of energy on the planet. Dark energy has had the upper hand for millenia, and the new evolutionary energies reaching us, particularly the Divine Feminine, are flooding the planet with Light. This is changing everything including activating more of our DNA. Dark Energy is fighting hard, through people, and ISIS is a clear example. The good news is that the battle is already won, because the tipping point has been reached. The only remaining question is how long it will take, and that depends on us too. Make no mistake, Dark Energy knows our weaknesses and will claw at old weaknesses that we have not totally addressed, to try to get us to feed it. Our response if we can achieve it should be to react with Love and Light, not Darkness, so it is important not to be afraid, not allow ourselves to be fazed by horrific videos which are being put out just for that purpose by the unwitting dupes that Dark Energy is using. This is our job, to remain steadfast and hold the Light. We cannot influence the Outer World of events, but we can hold fast the Inner World. One lighted match in a dark room will overcome much of the darkness, so the task is not so daunting as you might think. Good to hear from you again Paul.
James Milton
Stan Ellis wrote at February 19, 2015
0 Votes
Well said James. I am reminded of some quotes by brilliant luminaries. Gandhi said we can stop violence with aggression (i.e. military response)but that cannot bring peace... peace is it's own resolution. In support of Gandhi's quote, Einstein said responding in the same old way and expecting different results is insane. Yes, we have to stop the cruel bloodshed of ISSIS and a military response brings more immediate results. We also need to put an end to having to use Military Responding to try and solve problems. The history of humankind proves that it doesn't last. I am completely with you on developing Positive Energy solutions through love and light. Thought is energy and heartfelt thought carries more power than analytical reasoning without feeling it. I suggest a global Intention Exercise to bring an end to ISSIS is a good way to begin.
Last Update on February 19, 2015 by Stan Ellis
Stan Ellis